First Contact Resolution (FCR) Benchmarks

First Contact Resolution

The industry average first contact resolution rate is 53.7%, an interesting yet meaningless number for determining what your FCR performance level should be.

First contact closure is influenced by so many factors that an industry-wide average does not provide a sufficiently accurate benchmark from which to determine what your FCR performance level should be.  Benchmarks at best suggest the “vicinity” for your performance.

The chart below provides industry average FCR rates organized by common product characteristics including: The type of product; product complexity; type of customer supported, product price level; and the quality of the product as measured by defect rates.

Featured Report: Featured: First Contact Resolution

The First Contact Resolution playbook provides a step-by-step guide for defining and implementing a First Contact Resolution (FCR) metric.   The playbook defines a consistent and effective process to measure how efficiently each customer question gets to the person that has the skills, knowledge and tools to provide the right answer the first time the customer engages with Support.  The playbook offers practical guidance about how to measure and optimize FCR performance to improve customer satisfaction, NPS and increase overall support efficiency and effectiveness.

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